Sugar consumption recommendations

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According to the American Heart Association, over the past 30 years, Americans have steadily consumed more and more added sugars in their diets, which has contributed to the obesity epidemic.

Reducing the amount of added sugars we eat cuts calories and can help you improve your heart health and control your weight.

Are you addicted to sugar? Here is one way that can help you kick the habit. Could sugar be making us overweight and prematurely old? According to some experts, it is.

Sugar not only helps pack on the pounds, it's a leading cause of heart disease. At least part of the reason is that because people can't stop consuming it. 10% of the U.S. population are true sugar addicts. Their brains reacts to sugar the way an addict's brain reacts to drugs.

While sugar in moderation isn't bad for you, it can be hard to have self-control when it comes to sweets. One way to rein in your sugar intake is by going cold turkey for three days. Eliminate all sugar, including the natural kind in fruits and starchy vegetables. Experts also say you should avoid dairy, grains and alcohol. During this time, you should  basically be eating lean protein, vegetables and healthy fats only. This will recalibrate your palate, allowing you to taste the natural sweetness in foods.

After that, you  can have small amounts of fruit and dairy. Slowly add back in starches like pasta and treats like red wine or dark chocolate over the next four weeks. This could help give you control over how much sugar you consume.

The American Heart Association recommends limiting the amount of added sugars you consume to no more than half of your daily discretionary calorie allowance.

For most American women, that's about 6 teaspoons per day and 9 teaspoons per day for men.

 

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