LANSING, Mich. (WJMN) – Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced the recipients of over $7.3 million in grant funding under the MI Clean Water Plan on Thursday. Among the 15 communities in Michigan to receive grants, two are in the Upper Peninsula: Forsyth Township and Ishpeming.

Most of the 15 grants were awarded under the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) Drinking Water Assessment Management (DWAM) program.

Forsyth Township will receive $342,000, while the City of Ishpeming will receive $663,000. Both are receiving the grants for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory development and Asset Management Plan updates. 

“The City of Ishpeming currently estimates that there is $15 million in lead service line replacement required throughout our city,” said Ishpeming City Manager Craig H. Cugini. “The DWAM grant will help us to verify this estimate and properly plan for the programming of funds. We are grateful for this funding, as it was not programmed and would have directly affected the community’s funding for other critical needs.” 

DWAM is a one-time, $36.5 million grant program developed under the Clean Water Plan. It works to help drinking water suppliers develop and update asset management plans, and develop a Distribution System Materials Inventory to identify materials that are part of the distribution system. This includes lead service lines, as defined in Michigan’s revised Lead and Copper Rule.

“Every Michigander in every community deserves access to safe drinking water,” Governor Whitmer said. “Today’s grants will help 15 communities upgrade their water infrastructure, replace lead service lines, and tackle PFAS and other toxic contaminants. Since I took office, Michigan has invested more in our water infrastructure than the previous eight years. Thanks to bipartisan investments in water infrastructure through the MI Clean Water Plan, we have created jobs, protected public health, and lowered costs for Michigan families. We will keep getting things done on the kitchen-table issues and ensuring working families have access to clean water.” 

The full list of recipients is as follows:

City of Carson City: $341,129 for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory development and Asset Management Plan updates.  

City of Coleman: $174,424 for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory development and Asset Management Plan updates. 

City of Ishpeming : $663,000 for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory development and Asset Management Plan updates.  

City of Montrose: $177,613 for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory development and Asset Management Plan updates.  

City of Port Huron: $330,649 for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory development and Asset Management Plan updates.  

City of Warren: $413,840 for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory development. 

Clinton Charter Township: $336,376 for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory development and Asset Management Plan updates. 

Forsyth Township: $342,000 for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory development and Asset Management Plan updates. 

Harrison Charter Township: $328,116 for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory work and Asset Management Plan updates. 

Village of Bellevue: $156,082 for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory development and Asset Management Plan updates. 

Village of Capac: $503,536 for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory development and Asset Management Plan updates. 

Village of Three Oaks: $236,150 for water system enhancement through Distribution System Materials Inventory development and Asset Management Plan updates. 

EGLE awarded the City of Southfield a $1,104,421 Consolidation and Contamination Risk Reduction (C2R2) grant. C2R2 funds projects that remove or reduce per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) or other contaminants, as defined under state or federal drinking water regulations, or efforts to consolidate systems or connect private residential wells to a local municipal system. All funds have been allocated, and EGLE is no longer accepting applications. 

EGLE also awarded Drinking Water Infrastructure (DWI) grants of $1.2 million to the City of St. Joseph and $997,500 to the City of Howell